users online Random Things

(Source: bbodysnatchers, via lit-ost)

But I repeat for the hundredth time, there is one case, one only, when man may consciously, purposely, desire what is injurious to himself, what is stupid, very stupid — simply in order to have the right to desire for himself even what is very stupid and not to be bound by an obligation to desire only what is sensible.
- Fyodor Dostoevsky, Notes from the Underground (via talesofpassingtime)

(via blacktout)


(Source: maudit)

I’m not used to being loved. I wouldn’t know what to do.
- F. Scott Fitzgerald, ”More Than Just A House  (via emiliaclarke)

(Source: fitzgeraldquotes, via persephones)


I feel a sadness I expected and which comes only from myself. I say I’ve always been sad. That I can see the same sadness in photos of myself when I was small. That today, recognizing it as the sadness I’ve always had, I could almost call it by my own name, it’s so like me.
- Marguerite Duras, from The Lover  (via mirroir)

(Source: violentwavesofemotion, via mirroir)


You ask me why I spend my life writing?
Do I find entertainment?
Is it worthwhile?
Above all, does it pay?
If not, then, is there a reason…?
I write only because
There is a voice within me
That will not be still.
- Sylvia Plath (via petrichour)

(via fuckyeahexistentialism)


A not admitting of the wound
Until it grew so wide
That all my Life had entered it
- Emily Dickinson, from “[1188]” (via proustitute)

(via blacktout)



(Source: rhera)

realityayslum:

{ Herbert Ponting - The Freezing of the Sea, 1913 }
 
' This image has also been titled more fully elsewhere as “Looking to Cape Barne from Cape Evans: Mirage Effect” and has been dated to March 3, 1911. Herbert Ponting produced some of the most well-known and enduring images of the Antarctic. A self-taught professional, he spent his early career travelling through Asia and Europe delivering beautifully composed photographs of landscapes and peoples back to a wide variety of magazines, periodicals, newspapers and publishers. It was his assignment as official photographer and cinematographer on Captain Robert Falcon Scott's British Antarctic Expedition 1910-1914 that was to dominate the rest of his life. He was to spend a gruelling 14 months at the hut at Cape Evans, building himself a small photographic darkroom in order to develop film and store his camera equipment. He produced over 1,700 photographs during his stay in Antarctica which explore the Antarctic landscape and wildlife, whilst also visually documenting day-to-day expedition life. Ponting was the first to bring an artistic eye to the science of recording polar expeditions and life. His book 'The Great White South', illustrated with 164 of his photographs, was published in 1921 and was a huge success. ' … via I Photo Central

realityayslum:

{ Herbert Ponting - The Freezing of the Sea, 1913 }

 

' This image has also been titled more fully elsewhere as “Looking to Cape Barne from Cape Evans: Mirage Effect” and has been dated to March 3, 1911. Herbert Ponting produced some of the most well-known and enduring images of the Antarctic. A self-taught professional, he spent his early career travelling through Asia and Europe delivering beautifully composed photographs of landscapes and peoples back to a wide variety of magazines, periodicals, newspapers and publishers. It was his assignment as official photographer and cinematographer on Captain Robert Falcon Scott's British Antarctic Expedition 1910-1914 that was to dominate the rest of his life. He was to spend a gruelling 14 months at the hut at Cape Evans, building himself a small photographic darkroom in order to develop film and store his camera equipment. He produced over 1,700 photographs during his stay in Antarctica which explore the Antarctic landscape and wildlife, whilst also visually documenting day-to-day expedition life. Ponting was the first to bring an artistic eye to the science of recording polar expeditions and life. His book 'The Great White South', illustrated with 164 of his photographs, was published in 1921 and was a huge success. ' … via I Photo Central

(via batvalentinworld)

I used to analyze myself down to the last thread, used to compare myself with others, recalled all the smallest glances, smiles and words of those to whom I’d tried to be frank, interpreted everything in a bad light, laughed viciously at my attempts ‘to be like the rest’ –and suddenly, in the midst of my laughing, I’d give way to sadness, fall into ludicrous despondency and once again start the whole process all over again – in short, I went round and round like a squirrel on a wheel.
- Fyodor Dostoyevsky, Crime and Punishment (via quotes-shape-us)

Don’t listen to those motivational speakers. If at first it doesn’t work, don’t try again. Quit. Just quit.
- Calculus professor on integration (via mathprofessorquotes)

I am very sad and I feel more miserable than I can say, and I do not know how far I’ve come. I do not know what to do or what to think, but vehemently desire to leave this place. I feel so melancholy.
- Vincent van Gogh, from Letters (1875-1890)

(Source: oiseauperdu, via mirroir)


Imaginary Suicides

They turn the key in the door, take out
their old, well-hidden letters,
read them quietly, then drag
their feet a final time.

Their life has been a tragedy, they say.
God! people’s frightful laughter,
and the tears, the sweat, nostalgia
of the skies, the landscape’s solitude.

They stand there by the window, gazing at
the trees, the children, all of nature,
at the marble-workers hammering away,
the sun that wants to set forever.

It’s over. Here’s the note —
appropriately short, profound, and simple,
full of indifference and forgiveness
for whoever’s going to weep and read it.

They look in the mirror, look at the time,
ask if it’s madness maybe, a mistake.
"It’s over now" they murmur;
deep down, of course, they’re going to put it off.

-Kostas Karyotakis